What's cyber security?

Computer security, cybersecurity or information technology security (IT security) is the security of computer systems in the theft of or damage to their own hardware, applications, or digital information, in addition to in the disruption or misdirection of their solutions they supply. The area is becoming more important because of greater reliance on computer technologies, the web and wireless system standards like Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and as a result of development of "smart" devices, such as televisions, smartphones, and the numerous devices which constitute the"Internet of things". Due to its complexity, both regarding science and politics, cybersecurity can also be one of the significant challenges in the modern world.

What's cyber security?

Organizations face many threats to their data systems and information. Knowing all of the fundamental elements to cyber safety is the first step to fulfilling these threats.

Types of cyber security.

The reach of cyber protection is broad. The core regions are explained below, and some other fantastic cyber security plan must take all of them into consideration.

Critical infrastructure includes the cyber-physical systems which society is based on, for example, electricity grid, water purification, traffic lighting and hospitals. Plugging a power plant to the world wide web, as an instance, makes it vulnerable to cyber attacks. The solution for associations accountable for critical infrastructure would be to carry out due diligence to safeguard recognize the vulnerabilities and protect from them. Everyone else must evaluate the way an attack on critical infrastructure that they rely on could impact them and develop a contingency plan.
Critical infrastructure.
Critical infrastructure includes the cyber-physical systems which society is based on, for example, electricity grid, water purification, traffic lighting and hospitals. Plugging a power plant to the world wide web, as an instance, makes it vulnerable to cyber attacks. The solution for associations accountable for critical infrastructure would be to carry out due diligence to safeguard recognize the vulnerabilities and protect from them. Everyone else must evaluate the way an attack on critical infrastructure that they rely on could impact them and develop a contingency plan.
Network security guards against malicious intrusion in addition to malicious insiders. Ensuring network security frequently requires trade-offs. By way of instance, access controls like additional logins may be required, but slow down productivity. Tools used to track network safety create a great deal of information -- so much that legitimate alarms are often overlooked. To help better handle network security monitoring, safety teams are using machine learning how to flag abnormal traffic and alert to risks in real time.
Network security.
Network security guards against malicious intrusion in addition to malicious insiders. Ensuring network security frequently requires trade-offs. By way of instance, access controls like additional logins may be required, but slow down productivity. Tools used to track network safety create a great deal of information -- so much that legitimate alarms are often overlooked. To help better handle network security monitoring, safety teams are using machine learning how to flag abnormal traffic and alert to risks in real time.
The business's move to the cloud generates new safety challenges. By way of instance, 2017 has seen nearly weekly information breaches from badly configured cloud cases. Cloud suppliers are creating new safety tools to help business users secure their information, however, the bottom line remains: Moving into the cloud isn't a panacea for performing due diligence in regards to cyber security.
Cloud security.
The business's move to the cloud generates new safety challenges. By way of instance, 2017 has seen nearly weekly information breaches from badly configured cloud cases. Cloud suppliers are creating new safety tools to help business users secure their information, however, the bottom line remains: Moving into the cloud isn't a panacea for performing due diligence in regards to cyber security.
Application security (AppSec), especially web application security, has become the weakest technical point of attack, but few organizations adequately mitigate all the OWASP Top Ten web vulnerabilities. AppSec begins with secure coding practices, and should be augmented by fuzzing and penetration testing. Rapid application development and deployment to the cloud has seen the advent of DevOps as a new discipline. DevOps teams typically prioritize business needs over security, a focus that will likely change given the proliferation of threats.
Application security.
Application security (AppSec), especially web application security, has become the weakest technical point of attack, but few organizations adequately mitigate all the OWASP Top Ten web vulnerabilities. AppSec begins with secure coding practices, and should be augmented by fuzzing and penetration testing. Rapid application development and deployment to the cloud has seen the advent of DevOps as a new discipline. DevOps teams typically prioritize business needs over security, a focus that will likely change given the proliferation of threats.
IoT describes a huge array of crucial and non-critical cyber physiological systems, such as appliances, sensors, printers and safety cameras. IoT devices often ship in an insecure condition and give little to no security, posing risks to not just their customers, but also to other people online, since these devices frequently find themselves part of a botnet. This presents special security challenges for the home users and society.
Internet of things (IoT) security.
IoT describes a huge array of crucial and non-critical cyber physiological systems, such as appliances, sensors, printers and safety cameras. IoT devices often ship in an insecure condition and give little to no security, posing risks to not just their customers, but also to other people online, since these devices frequently find themselves part of a botnet. This presents special security challenges for the home users and society.

A British man has been jailed for two years after police caught him using a notorious Remote Access Trojan (RAT) to hijack the webcams of young women, and spy upon them.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

We discuss how Microsoft Word helped trap a multi-million dollar fraudster, how Amazon Ring may be recording more than you’re comfortable with, and how teens are flocking to TikTok (and why that might be a problem).

All this and much more is covered in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Maria Varmazis.

In the early hours of Tuesday morning, city officials in Las Vegas were alerted that their computer network had suffered a security breach.

If it’s a ransomware attack, it sounds unlikely that they’ll be willing to give in to the extortionists’ demands.

For days Travelex’s website has said it was down for “planned maintenance”.

Now it finally admits that the company is struggling with a ransomware outbreak that has disrupted its online services.

Download AV-Comparatives’ real-world test which reports on how well different security products defend against the increasing number of APT attacks.

It wasn’t a case of “Happy Holidays” for the employees of an Arkansas-based telemarketing firm after they were told to find new jobs just before Christmas, after failing to recover from a ransomware attack.

The world’s largest foreign exchange bureau is still offline today, and the online currency services of other high street banks are disrupted.

Just before the UK’s General Election in December, I recorded an interview with the “Totally Unprepared Politics” podcast.

Thanks to Adill Al-ashgar for inviting me on the show. And don’t worry, although we do touch on some politics, it’s mostly about cybersecurity.

It’s not only external hackers who pose a threat to the customer data that your company stores.

DSG Retail, the parent company of Currys PC World and Dixons Travel, has been fined £500,000 for a hack which lasted from July 2017 to April 2018.

But if the breach had lasted for just one month longer, they could have expected a much MUCH larger penalty.

Operation Goldfish Alpha was a six-month effort to secure hacked devices across Southeast Asia.

Read more in my article on the Bitdefender BOX blog.

A Firefox browser vulnerability that could allow attackers to take control of computers is being exploited in the wild.

Make sure you are running the very latest version of Firefox.

A rapping bank worker is accused of stealing from the vault, the devices that can hide your car’s true mileage, and why it may be a case of “No No No” rather than “Ho Ho Ho” when it comes to IoT toys this Christmas.

And as Carole sups the mulled wine, Graham has problems with his internet connection…

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast.

The City of Waco has warned residents that their online payments for water services may have been intercepted by hackers who stole credit card details.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

We’re joined by special guest Jamie Bartlett of “The Missing Cryptoqueen” podcast in this bumper episode where we discuss his investigation into the OneCoin cryptocurrency scam, the Russian cybercriminals behind Evil Corp, and the mysterious leaks about the NHS that have turned oh-so-political…

All this and much much more can be found in the latest edition of the “Smashing Security” podcast, hosted by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault.

Andreas Dowling used accounts and text-to-speech software to hide his identity as he caused 35,000 pupils to be evacuated from their schools.

Users of the Chinese cryptocurrency exchange IDAX must be feeling a little anxious right now. It has locked its cold wallet, suspending all deposits and withdrawals, after its CEO allegedly disappeared.

Earlier this week Spanish security firm Prosegur shut down its network after its systems were hit by a ransomware infection.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

The personal details of some past and present Palo Alto Networks employees – their names, dates of birth and social security numbers – have been exposed online. But is it really the company’s fault?

Read more in my article on the Bitdefender Business Insights blog.

Internet users are being sent sextortion emails, claiming to have recorded videos of their X-rated website visits and demanding payment be made in Litecoin.

In this 20 minute clip from a special bonus episode produced for our Patreon supporters, Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault discuss the 2014 hack of Sony Pictures – reportedly carried out by North Korea for the very oddest of reasons…

Web-hosting company 1&1 has been hit with one of the largest fines dished out so far under European GDPR legislation, Germany’s federal privacy watchdog has announced.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

A new survey has revealed some alarming news about the way users are choosing their passwords in their homes and workplace.

Never let it be said that malware authors don’t continue to find innovative ways to prevent their creations from being detected.

Women’s activewear retailer Sweaty Betty has emailed some of its customers warning that their payment card details may have been compromised by malicious code running on its website.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

A new AWS feature is supposed to help avoid accidental misconfigurations that could result in sensitive data being exposed, a company’s brand being damaged, and even – potentially – put its customers at risk.

Read more in my article on the Bitdefender Business Insights blog.

CyrusOne, a major provider of enterprise data center services, is reported to have suffered a ransomware attack.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

What is Kaspersky’s ugly ring for? Is there something suspicious about how NordVPN lets you stream Disney+? And why did a hacker impersonate a music producer?

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Maria Varmazis.

Vulnerability-reporting platform HackerOne has paid out a US $20,000 bounty after a researcher discovered he was able to access some other users’ bug reports on HackerOne’s website.

You may have missed it amongst the many news reports of the denial-of-service attacks troubling Labour, but that wasn’t the only reason the UK political party made the cybersecurity headlines this week.

With a drama-filled general election campaign underway in the United Kingdom, the Labour Party says that its systems suffered a “sophisticated and large-scale cyber-attack.”

Check out the talk I gave in Dublin about whether we should really consider cybercriminals to all be evil geniuses…

Hundreds of millions of Twitter users now have an improved way to better safeguard their accounts from being compromised.

A bank has some of the worst password advice ever, travellers are told to be wary when USB charging their smartphones and laptops, and a gamer has his YouTube account hacked.

All this and much much more is discussed in the latest edition of the “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Geoff White.

Security researchers have uncovered a vulnerability in Android smartphones that could allow an attacker to secretly take photos and record videos without any permissions being granted.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

The Conservative Party press office posed as an independent fact-checking service on Twitter, abusing its verified status in an attempt to fool British voters.

I find it hard to see it any other way…

British businessman Arron Banks, one of the self-styled “Bad Boys of Brexit” and a leading figure of the Leave.EU campaign, has had his Twitter account hacked.

A 21-year-old man who made half a million dollars running DDoS-for-hire services has been sentenced to prison for 13 months.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Ransomware hit Louisiana’s state government hard yesterday, shutting down multiple websites and email systems after it fell victim for the second time in just a few months to a ransomware attack.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

I’m off to Dublin this week to join the galaxy of security superstars speaking at IRISSCON 2019. Find out more about the conference and see you there!

Yet another company has been found woefully lacking when it comes to securing consumers’ data.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

The British Home Office’s app for EU citizens applying to live and work in the UK post-Brexit “could allow hackers to steal phone numbers, addresses and passport details.”

But is this something worth losing any sleep over?

The UK’s Labour Party kicks off its election campaign with claims that it has suffered a sophisticated cyber-attack, Apple’s credit card is accused of being sexist, and what is Google up to with Project Nightingale?

All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning “Smashing Security” podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by John Hawes.

Facebook and Twitter have announced that personal data related to hundreds of users may have been improperly accessed after users logged into third-party Android apps with their social media accounts.

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

For a long time it has been regarded as one of the security industry’s urban myths, but now law enforcement agencies have confirmed that they are investigating whether thieves have been identifying which cars might be carrying high tech gadgets through the use of Bluetooth scanners.

Read more in my article on the Bitdefender BOX blog.

Hackers have once again successfully compromised the website of Chinese phone manufacturer OnePlus, opening up opportunities for online criminals to target the company’s customers.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Imagine you’re in an abusive relationship, and things have turned violent.

You leave him, block his Facebook account, and update the name on your profile to hide your identity.

Would you expect your ex-partner to be able to see what your new name is?

Listen up if you’re still using an iPhone 5 – you need to update to iOS 10.3.4 before Sunday November 3, or you may find your smartphone loses access to the internet.

Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

I’m delighted to announce that I will be moderating NISC 2019 in Cheshire next week. It’s a great conference with some terrific cybersecurity speakers. Find out more about how you can participate too.

Currently BlueKeep attacks have been causing computers to crash, and drawing attention to themselves.

But that may be about to change…

Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.