What's cyber security?

Computer security, cybersecurity or information technology security (IT security) is the security of computer systems in the theft of or damage to their own hardware, applications, or digital information, in addition to in the disruption or misdirection of their solutions they supply. The area is becoming more important because of greater reliance on computer technologies, the web and wireless system standards like Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and as a result of development of "smart" devices, such as televisions, smartphones, and the numerous devices which constitute the"Internet of things". Due to its complexity, both regarding science and politics, cybersecurity can also be one of the significant challenges in the modern world.

What's cyber security?

Organizations face many threats to their data systems and information. Knowing all of the fundamental elements to cyber safety is the first step to fulfilling these threats.

Types of cyber security.

The reach of cyber protection is broad. The core regions are explained below, and some other fantastic cyber security plan must take all of them into consideration.

Critical infrastructure includes the cyber-physical systems which society is based on, for example, electricity grid, water purification, traffic lighting and hospitals. Plugging a power plant to the world wide web, as an instance, makes it vulnerable to cyber attacks. The solution for associations accountable for critical infrastructure would be to carry out due diligence to safeguard recognize the vulnerabilities and protect from them. Everyone else must evaluate the way an attack on critical infrastructure that they rely on could impact them and develop a contingency plan.
Critical infrastructure.
Critical infrastructure includes the cyber-physical systems which society is based on, for example, electricity grid, water purification, traffic lighting and hospitals. Plugging a power plant to the world wide web, as an instance, makes it vulnerable to cyber attacks. The solution for associations accountable for critical infrastructure would be to carry out due diligence to safeguard recognize the vulnerabilities and protect from them. Everyone else must evaluate the way an attack on critical infrastructure that they rely on could impact them and develop a contingency plan.
Network security guards against malicious intrusion in addition to malicious insiders. Ensuring network security frequently requires trade-offs. By way of instance, access controls like additional logins may be required, but slow down productivity. Tools used to track network safety create a great deal of information -- so much that legitimate alarms are often overlooked. To help better handle network security monitoring, safety teams are using machine learning how to flag abnormal traffic and alert to risks in real time.
Network security.
Network security guards against malicious intrusion in addition to malicious insiders. Ensuring network security frequently requires trade-offs. By way of instance, access controls like additional logins may be required, but slow down productivity. Tools used to track network safety create a great deal of information -- so much that legitimate alarms are often overlooked. To help better handle network security monitoring, safety teams are using machine learning how to flag abnormal traffic and alert to risks in real time.
The business's move to the cloud generates new safety challenges. By way of instance, 2017 has seen nearly weekly information breaches from badly configured cloud cases. Cloud suppliers are creating new safety tools to help business users secure their information, however, the bottom line remains: Moving into the cloud isn't a panacea for performing due diligence in regards to cyber security.
Cloud security.
The business's move to the cloud generates new safety challenges. By way of instance, 2017 has seen nearly weekly information breaches from badly configured cloud cases. Cloud suppliers are creating new safety tools to help business users secure their information, however, the bottom line remains: Moving into the cloud isn't a panacea for performing due diligence in regards to cyber security.
Application security (AppSec), especially web application security, has become the weakest technical point of attack, but few organizations adequately mitigate all the OWASP Top Ten web vulnerabilities. AppSec begins with secure coding practices, and should be augmented by fuzzing and penetration testing. Rapid application development and deployment to the cloud has seen the advent of DevOps as a new discipline. DevOps teams typically prioritize business needs over security, a focus that will likely change given the proliferation of threats.
Application security.
Application security (AppSec), especially web application security, has become the weakest technical point of attack, but few organizations adequately mitigate all the OWASP Top Ten web vulnerabilities. AppSec begins with secure coding practices, and should be augmented by fuzzing and penetration testing. Rapid application development and deployment to the cloud has seen the advent of DevOps as a new discipline. DevOps teams typically prioritize business needs over security, a focus that will likely change given the proliferation of threats.
IoT describes a huge array of crucial and non-critical cyber physiological systems, such as appliances, sensors, printers and safety cameras. IoT devices often ship in an insecure condition and give little to no security, posing risks to not just their customers, but also to other people online, since these devices frequently find themselves part of a botnet. This presents special security challenges for the home users and society.
Internet of things (IoT) security.
IoT describes a huge array of crucial and non-critical cyber physiological systems, such as appliances, sensors, printers and safety cameras. IoT devices often ship in an insecure condition and give little to no security, posing risks to not just their customers, but also to other people online, since these devices frequently find themselves part of a botnet. This presents special security challenges for the home users and society.
Apple Mac users are being advised to update their operating system as a matter of priority, after malicious hackers have discovered a way of bypassing privacy protections. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Yes, you read that correctly. FORTY MILLION DOLLARS.

With all the headlines about ransomware attacks hitting companies hard, you might think there's only bad news around the subject. Well, think again. Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

The Colonial Pipeline attack has shone light on the activities of the Darkside ransomware gang, we take a skeptical look at cryptocurrencies and the blockchain, and Eufy security cameras suffer an embarrassing security failure. All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by BBC technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones. Plus don't miss our featured interview with Vanessa Pegueros of OneLogin.

I hope you're being cautious if you're installing extensions from the Chrome Web Store for your browser and care about your online security. Because it's reported that a bogus Chrome add-on purporting to be "Microsoft Authenticator" successfully managed to sneak its way in, and duped hundreds of people into downloading it. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Apple is talking up the efforts it makes to police the iOS App Store, revealing that during 2020 it rejected more than 215,000 iPhone apps for violating its privacy policies. On its website, Apple detailed an array of statistics of how it has protected App Store users from being defrauded. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

One week after the French branch of cyber insurance giant AXA said that it would no longer be writing policies to cover ransomware payments, the company's operations in Thailand, Malaysia, Hong Kong, and the Phillippines have reportedly been hit... by a ransomware attack.

A leading manufacturer of gaming hardware has warned internet users to be wary of downloading fake versions of free software it distributes to overclock GPUs. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Sounds like a great opportunity. It’s not as if things can get worse, right?

Bloomberg reports that the extortionists of Colonial Pipeline received almost $5 million worth of cryptocurrency, but that the tool they provided to decrypt IT systems wasn't up to the job.

Earlier today, Ireland’s health service (the HSE) shut down all of its IT systems following what they describes as a “significant ransomware attack.”

The Water Services Regulation Authority (better known as Ofwat) which is the UK Government's department responsible for regulating the privatised water and sewage industry in England and Wales, said it had received 21,486 malicious emails so far this year - with 5,149 classified as phishing attacks. At first glance that sounds pretty bad for such a short period of time, especially when you consider that Ofwat only employs 266 people. But is it? Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

Facebook says it's sticking up for the little guys as it picks a fight with Apple, there are testing times on the trains, and Twitter takes a tip. All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Ray [REDACTED].

Many thanks to the great folks at Recorded Future, who are sponsoring my writing this week. Recorded Future provides deep, detailed insight into emerging threats by automatically collecting, analyzing, and organizing billions of data points from the Web. And now, with its FREE Cyber Daily email all IT security professionals can access information about the … Continue reading "Get FREE threat intelligence on hackers and exploits with the Recorded Future Cyber Daily"

Tulsa, Oklahoma, is reportedly the latest in a long line of American cities to have fallen victim to a ransomware attack. The attack, which occurred on Friday evening, caused the city's IT security teams to shut down many of Tula's internal systems over the weekend "out of an abundance of caution" while they worked around the clock at the weekend in an attempt to restore operations from backups. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

The 5,500 miles of Colonial Pipeline, which carry over 100 million gallons of fuel every day, from Houston, Texas to the New York Harbor, has been offline since May 7 following a ransomware attack.

Insurance giant AXA has said that it is no longer writing cyberinsurance policies in France that cover ransom payments to extortionists. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Millions of smart TVs in China may have collected data without the knowledge of viewers about Wi-Fi networks found within range and attached devices. Read more in my article on the Bitdefender BOX blog.

The US Defense Department and third-party military contractors are being advised to strengthen the security of their operational technology (OT) in the wake of security breaches, such as the SolarWinds supply chain attack. Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

How did the SCAM cryptocurrency become a success? Why is Google allowing government rip-off ads to still appear on search results? And why on earth is everyone suddenly spending millions of dollars on NFTs? All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Rip Off Britain's David McClelland.

Signal tried to run targeted ads on Instagram that showed users *how* they had been targeted, and revealed the extraordinary amount of data Facebook collects about users.

Uh oh. Not only were Peloton bikes leaking personal information about users, but when told about the problem the company was far from perfect in its response.

Police have shut down one Boystown, ome of the world's largest child abuse image websites, following an investigation that saw authorities across the globe work together to identify and apprehend those responsible for its creation and maintenance.

DigitalOcean, the popular cloud-hosting provider, has told some of its customers that their billing details were exposed due to what it described as a "flaw." Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Google loses its domain in Argentina, how do gripe sites make their dough, and has John Deere solved the cybersecurity problem? All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Mark Stockley.

The online musical instrument marketplace Reverb has suffered a data breach which has exposed the personal details of 5.6 million users. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Reports indicate that Merseyrail, the railway network serving Liverpool and the surrounding area, has been hit by the Lockbit ransomware.

Police in South Australia have arrested a man for allegedly tampering with Covid-19 QR codes, replacing them with fake codes that could take the public to anti-vaxxer websites.

Apple has released a brand new update for its macOS Big Sur operating system, and you really should install it. Amongst other fixes, Big Sur 11.3 patches a zero-day vulnerability that could allow an attacker to craft malicious payloads that will not be checked by Gatekeeper, the security check built into Apple's operating system that is supposed to block the execution of software from untrusted sources.

I had great fun this week appearing as a guest on Recorded Future's podcast. Tune in to the podcast to hear host Dave Bittner and I have a casual chat where we share some stories from the trenches, and I confess a malware-related party trick that I used to perform.

So, what do you do if you're a ransomware gang which has just caught the attention of not just the world's media, but also the FBI and the President of the United States?

Did you receive an email claiming to come from Twitter that asked you to confirm your account? Don't panic - it wasn't a phishing attack. Twitter goofed up.

Learn more about the notorious REvil ransomware in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

Facebook has managed to do the seemingly impossible - and had a data breach about its handling of a data breach. Meanwhile, we chat to the host of the brand new podcast about North Korea's hackers targeting the rest of the world, and discuss if an intern can be trusted to monitor your security. All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Geoff White and featuring an interview with Duo's Helen Patton.

The social network has goofed again. But this time it's Facebook's PR team's handling of a data breach rather than its users who have been left exposed.

Thanks to the folks at Cisco who have invited me to participate in an online chat on Monday April 26. Learn more and register your interest to ensure you don't miss it.

Manhunt, a popular gay dating service, has suffered a data breach which may have put members at risk of exposure.

A key member of the FIN7 cybercrime gang - which is said to have caused over one billion dollars worth of damage around the world - has been sentenced to 10 years in jail. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Graham Cluley Security News is sponsored this week by the folks at Recorded Future. Thanks to the great team there for their support! Recorded Future provides deep, detailed insight into emerging threats by automatically collecting, analyzing, and organizing billions of data points from the Web. And now, with its FREE Cyber Daily email all IT … Continue reading "Get FREE threat intelligence on hackers and exploits with the Recorded Future Cyber Daily"

The White House is reportedly moving swiftly forward with a plan to harden the security of the US power grid against hacking attacks. Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

Should insurance companies be banned from helping companies pay ransomware demands? How has malware messed with motorcars in the United States? And how are cybercriminals exploiting alcohol drinking during the pandemic? All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Maria Varmazis.

A school janitor has lost her job, and she says it's because she refused to download a smartphone app that would track her location.

Shoppers at Dutch supermarkets may have noticed that some cheeses were in short supply last week, and it was cybercriminals who are to blame. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Many Facebook users think they only have to worry about the data that they personally share about themselves on Facebook, by posting messages on the site, connecting with their friends, and liking posts. But the truth is that Facebook knows much more about you than that, by collecting data from your activities off-site as well.

Indian stock trading firm Upstox has revealed to users that it has suffered a serious security breach that may have seen unauthorised criminal access to millions of customers' personal information.

Graham Cluley Security News is sponsored this week by the folks at 1Password. Thanks to the great team there for their support! With Secrets Automation, 1Password now provides one place to house and manage all your secrets, from your team’s logins to infrastructure secrets. With everything under one roof, there’s no more disconnected audit logs, … Continue reading "Secure, orchestrate, and manage your company’s infrastructure secrets with 1Password Secrets Automation"

Users of Apple products have long loved the ability to wirelessly share files with each other, using AirDrop to transmit files between their iPhones and Macbooks. But researchers have discovered that security weaknesses could allow an attacker to obtain a victim's phone number and even email address. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Graham Cluley Security News is sponsored this week by the folks at Recorded Future. Thanks to the great team there for their support! Recorded Future provides deep, detailed insight into emerging threats by automatically collecting, analyzing, and organizing billions of data points from the Web. And now, with its FREE Cyber Daily email all IT … Continue reading "Get FREE threat intelligence on hackers and exploits with the Recorded Future Cyber Daily"

Live broadcasts from Australia's Channel 9 TV network were disrupted this weekend following what is believed to have been a cyber attack. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

It's just two days since former SNP leader Alex Salmond launched a brand new political party to campaign for an independent Scotland. And already it has suffered a data breach.