What's cyber security?

Computer security, cybersecurity or information technology security (IT security) is the security of computer systems in the theft of or damage to their own hardware, applications, or digital information, in addition to in the disruption or misdirection of their solutions they supply. The area is becoming more important because of greater reliance on computer technologies, the web and wireless system standards like Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and as a result of development of "smart" devices, such as televisions, smartphones, and the numerous devices which constitute the"Internet of things". Due to its complexity, both regarding science and politics, cybersecurity can also be one of the significant challenges in the modern world.

What's cyber security?

Organizations face many threats to their data systems and information. Knowing all of the fundamental elements to cyber safety is the first step to fulfilling these threats.

Types of cyber security.

The reach of cyber protection is broad. The core regions are explained below, and some other fantastic cyber security plan must take all of them into consideration.

Critical infrastructure includes the cyber-physical systems which society is based on, for example, electricity grid, water purification, traffic lighting and hospitals. Plugging a power plant to the world wide web, as an instance, makes it vulnerable to cyber attacks. The solution for associations accountable for critical infrastructure would be to carry out due diligence to safeguard recognize the vulnerabilities and protect from them. Everyone else must evaluate the way an attack on critical infrastructure that they rely on could impact them and develop a contingency plan.
Critical infrastructure.
Critical infrastructure includes the cyber-physical systems which society is based on, for example, electricity grid, water purification, traffic lighting and hospitals. Plugging a power plant to the world wide web, as an instance, makes it vulnerable to cyber attacks. The solution for associations accountable for critical infrastructure would be to carry out due diligence to safeguard recognize the vulnerabilities and protect from them. Everyone else must evaluate the way an attack on critical infrastructure that they rely on could impact them and develop a contingency plan.
Network security guards against malicious intrusion in addition to malicious insiders. Ensuring network security frequently requires trade-offs. By way of instance, access controls like additional logins may be required, but slow down productivity. Tools used to track network safety create a great deal of information -- so much that legitimate alarms are often overlooked. To help better handle network security monitoring, safety teams are using machine learning how to flag abnormal traffic and alert to risks in real time.
Network security.
Network security guards against malicious intrusion in addition to malicious insiders. Ensuring network security frequently requires trade-offs. By way of instance, access controls like additional logins may be required, but slow down productivity. Tools used to track network safety create a great deal of information -- so much that legitimate alarms are often overlooked. To help better handle network security monitoring, safety teams are using machine learning how to flag abnormal traffic and alert to risks in real time.
The business's move to the cloud generates new safety challenges. By way of instance, 2017 has seen nearly weekly information breaches from badly configured cloud cases. Cloud suppliers are creating new safety tools to help business users secure their information, however, the bottom line remains: Moving into the cloud isn't a panacea for performing due diligence in regards to cyber security.
Cloud security.
The business's move to the cloud generates new safety challenges. By way of instance, 2017 has seen nearly weekly information breaches from badly configured cloud cases. Cloud suppliers are creating new safety tools to help business users secure their information, however, the bottom line remains: Moving into the cloud isn't a panacea for performing due diligence in regards to cyber security.
Application security (AppSec), especially web application security, has become the weakest technical point of attack, but few organizations adequately mitigate all the OWASP Top Ten web vulnerabilities. AppSec begins with secure coding practices, and should be augmented by fuzzing and penetration testing. Rapid application development and deployment to the cloud has seen the advent of DevOps as a new discipline. DevOps teams typically prioritize business needs over security, a focus that will likely change given the proliferation of threats.
Application security.
Application security (AppSec), especially web application security, has become the weakest technical point of attack, but few organizations adequately mitigate all the OWASP Top Ten web vulnerabilities. AppSec begins with secure coding practices, and should be augmented by fuzzing and penetration testing. Rapid application development and deployment to the cloud has seen the advent of DevOps as a new discipline. DevOps teams typically prioritize business needs over security, a focus that will likely change given the proliferation of threats.
IoT describes a huge array of crucial and non-critical cyber physiological systems, such as appliances, sensors, printers and safety cameras. IoT devices often ship in an insecure condition and give little to no security, posing risks to not just their customers, but also to other people online, since these devices frequently find themselves part of a botnet. This presents special security challenges for the home users and society.
Internet of things (IoT) security.
IoT describes a huge array of crucial and non-critical cyber physiological systems, such as appliances, sensors, printers and safety cameras. IoT devices often ship in an insecure condition and give little to no security, posing risks to not just their customers, but also to other people online, since these devices frequently find themselves part of a botnet. This presents special security challenges for the home users and society.
Did you receive an email claiming to come from Twitter that asked you to confirm your account? Don't panic - it wasn't a phishing attack. Twitter goofed up.

Learn more about the notorious REvil ransomware in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

Facebook has managed to do the seemingly impossible - and had a data breach about its handling of a data breach. Meanwhile, we chat to the host of the brand new podcast about North Korea's hackers targeting the rest of the world, and discuss if an intern can be trusted to monitor your security. All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Geoff White and featuring an interview with Duo's Helen Patton.

The social network has goofed again. But this time it's Facebook's PR team's handling of a data breach rather than its users who have been left exposed.

Thanks to the folks at Cisco who have invited me to participate in an online chat on Monday April 26. Learn more and register your interest to ensure you don't miss it.

Manhunt, a popular gay dating service, has suffered a data breach which may have put members at risk of exposure.

A key member of the FIN7 cybercrime gang - which is said to have caused over one billion dollars worth of damage around the world - has been sentenced to 10 years in jail. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Graham Cluley Security News is sponsored this week by the folks at Recorded Future. Thanks to the great team there for their support! Recorded Future provides deep, detailed insight into emerging threats by automatically collecting, analyzing, and organizing billions of data points from the Web. And now, with its FREE Cyber Daily email all IT … Continue reading "Get FREE threat intelligence on hackers and exploits with the Recorded Future Cyber Daily"

The White House is reportedly moving swiftly forward with a plan to harden the security of the US power grid against hacking attacks. Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

Should insurance companies be banned from helping companies pay ransomware demands? How has malware messed with motorcars in the United States? And how are cybercriminals exploiting alcohol drinking during the pandemic? All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Maria Varmazis.

A school janitor has lost her job, and she says it's because she refused to download a smartphone app that would track her location.

Shoppers at Dutch supermarkets may have noticed that some cheeses were in short supply last week, and it was cybercriminals who are to blame. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Many Facebook users think they only have to worry about the data that they personally share about themselves on Facebook, by posting messages on the site, connecting with their friends, and liking posts. But the truth is that Facebook knows much more about you than that, by collecting data from your activities off-site as well.

Indian stock trading firm Upstox has revealed to users that it has suffered a serious security breach that may have seen unauthorised criminal access to millions of customers' personal information.

Graham Cluley Security News is sponsored this week by the folks at 1Password. Thanks to the great team there for their support! With Secrets Automation, 1Password now provides one place to house and manage all your secrets, from your team’s logins to infrastructure secrets. With everything under one roof, there’s no more disconnected audit logs, … Continue reading "Secure, orchestrate, and manage your company’s infrastructure secrets with 1Password Secrets Automation"

Users of Apple products have long loved the ability to wirelessly share files with each other, using AirDrop to transmit files between their iPhones and Macbooks. But researchers have discovered that security weaknesses could allow an attacker to obtain a victim's phone number and even email address. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Graham Cluley Security News is sponsored this week by the folks at Recorded Future. Thanks to the great team there for their support! Recorded Future provides deep, detailed insight into emerging threats by automatically collecting, analyzing, and organizing billions of data points from the Web. And now, with its FREE Cyber Daily email all IT … Continue reading "Get FREE threat intelligence on hackers and exploits with the Recorded Future Cyber Daily"

Live broadcasts from Australia's Channel 9 TV network were disrupted this weekend following what is believed to have been a cyber attack. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

It's just two days since former SNP leader Alex Salmond launched a brand new political party to campaign for an independent Scotland. And already it has suffered a data breach.

UK fashion retailer FatFace, which made headlines this week by appearing to ask its customers to keep its cyber attack “strictly private and confidential”, has reportedly paid a $2 million ransom to the criminals responsible.

Insurance firm CNA Hardy says that it has suffered a "sophisticated cybersecurity attack" that has impacted its operations, including its email system. Which probably means that the cybercriminals also know which businesses are insured with CNA Hardy against ransomware attacks..

Cybercriminal extortionists have adopted a new tactic to to apply even more pressure on their corporate victims: contacting the victims' customers, and asking them to demand a ransom is paid to protect their own privacy. Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

Would it have been so hard for Facebook to apologise for allowing 533 million personal records - including users' phone numbers - to leak onto the internet? I don't think so. And yet sorry seems to be the hardest word...

The end of last month saw the official launch of the UK Cyber Security Council, a government-backed consortium with a mandate to boost career opportunities and professional standards in the cybersecurity sector, attract more talent, and increase diversity in the industry. But cybersecurity can be hard. Even for the professionals.

Food-delivery company Delveroo thought it would be fun to play an April Fool's trick on its customers in France. Unfortunately, what Deliveroo France did just wasn't funny. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

CISA, the US Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, has told federal agencies that they have until 1April 5 to scan their networks for evidence of intrusion by hackers, and report back the results. Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

FatFace stumps up $2 million to its ransomware extortionists, an IT administrator is caught with his pants down, Mobikwik blames its users for a data breach, and we burgle a house... virtually. All this and much much more is discussed in the latest edition of the "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Host Unknown's Thom Langford.

When an unintelligible tweet was made by the US Strategic Command's Twitter account, it's understandable that some folks might imagine a password was accidentally published to the world, or that perhaps the account had been compromised, or... gulp!... that it might be a US nuclear launch code.

Many thanks to the great folks at Recorded Future, who are sponsoring my writing this week. Recorded Future provides deep, detailed insight into emerging threats by automatically collecting, analyzing, and organizing billions of data points from the Web. And now, with its FREE Cyber Daily email all IT security professionals can access information about the … Continue reading "Get FREE threat intelligence on hackers and exploits with the Recorded Future Cyber Daily"

Deepfake expert Nina Schick joins us as we discuss synthetic media, Facebook's latest data fiasco, and some less-than-brilliant April Fool's tricks. All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning "Smashing Security" podcast, hosted by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault.

The FBI is reminding organisations of the serious threat posed by business email compromise (BEC) scams, declaring that it caused over $1.8 billion worth of losses to businesses last year. Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

How are cheerleaders being creeped out by deepfakes? What might Tinder tell potential dates about your murky past? And how should companies respond to the press when a security breach occurs? All this and much more is discussed in the latest edition of the award-winning "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Yvonne Eskenzi.

A teenager who hacked into the Twitter accounts of the rich and famous in an attempt to trick millions of their followers into a cryptocurrency scam will spend three years in prison as part of a plea agreement with prosecutors. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Graham Cluley Security News is sponsored this week by the folks at Recorded Future. Thanks to the great team there for their support! Recorded Future are experts at providing deep, detailed insight into emerging threats by automatically collecting, analyzing, and organizing billions of data points from the web. The FREE Cyber Daily email from Recorded … Continue reading "Recorded Future’s free Cyber Daily brings the latest trending threat insights to your inbox"

Researchers claim that not only are smart doorbells "unlikely" to have "any significant effect on residential burglary" rates, but they might actually increase the risk of burglary.

A UK college says it has closed its campus buildings for one week, and advised students that all lessons and lectures will be taking place online, following a ransomware attack.

Following news that the video streams of 150,000 webcams managed by Verkada had been breached, police in Switzerland have raided the alleged hacker's apartment.

British fashion retailer FatFace has been hacked. Whoops! I said it. Sorry. I'm not sure they wanted anyone to talk about it, so maybe I shouldn't have mentioned it.

PC manufacturer Acer might have received a $50 million ransom demand, a warning spreads on Facebook about a trick being used by hackers, and why are the City of London's police not happy about Sci Hub? All this and much much more is discussed in the latest edition of the "Smashing Security" podcast by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault, joined this week by Alex Eckelberry.

A man has been sentenced to two years in a federal prison after wreaking an act of revenge against a company, deleting so many staff's user accounts that the firm had to shut down completely for two days. Read more in my article on the Bitdefender Business Insights blog.

Things don't get much worse than having to admit to your employees that a gang of cybercriminals have broken into your infrastructure, stolen the private details (social security numbers, names and home addresses) of your staff, and are demanding that your company pays a ransom before further sensitive data is leaked. Well, actually they do... Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

A member of the REvil ransomware gang claims that the group specifically targets firms who have taken our cyber insurance. And what's more, it will hack insurance firms to identify them...

What do phone scammers who prey on the vulnerable deserve? Fart spray and glitterbombs, of course! A fun video makes some serious points, and could be a valuable lesson for your family and friends.

The hacker who claimed responsibility for breaching the live video streams of 150,000 CCTV cameras at police departments, hospitals, and well-known businesses has been charged by the US Department of Justice with hacking more than 100 companies. Read more in my article on the Hot for Security blog.

Graham Cluley Security News is sponsored this week by the folks at Recorded Future. Thanks to the great team there for their support! Recorded Future provides deep, detailed insight into emerging threats by automatically collecting, analyzing, and organizing billions of data points from the Web. And now, with its FREE Cyber Daily email all IT … Continue reading "Get FREE threat intelligence on hackers and exploits with the Recorded Future Cyber Daily"

Organisations hit by ransomware attacks are finding themselves paying out more than ever before, according to a new report. According to the research, the average payment following a ransomware attack in 2020 rocketed up 171% to $312,493 compared to $115,123 in 2019. And it’s not just the case that the criminals behind ransomware attacks are making more from their victims – they’re also becoming greedier. Read more in my article on the Tripwire State of Security blog.

Actor, presenter and writer Robert Llewellyn, famous for playing the part of Kryten in the science-fiction comedy "Red Dwarf," joins us as we discuss robots gone rogue, electric vehicle nightmares, and creepy companions. All this and much much more can be found in the latest edition of the "Smashing Security" podcast, hosted by computer security veterans Graham Cluley and Carole Theriault.

Microsoft has released emergency security patches for four zero-day vulnerabilities in its Exchange email server software, widely used by businesses.

Graham Cluley Security News is sponsored this week by the folks at Recorded Future. Thanks to the great team there for their support! Recorded Future provides deep, detailed insight into emerging threats by automatically collecting, analyzing, and organizing billions of data points from the web. The FREE Cyber Daily email, highlights trending threats selected from … Continue reading "Receive the latest trending threat insights delivered to your inbox with Recorded Future’s free Cyber Daily newsletter. Sign up now!"

Controversial cryptocurrency developer Tether says it will not give in to extortionists who are demanding a 500 Bitcoin ransom payment (currently worth approximately US $24 million).