What's cyber security?

Computer security, cybersecurity or information technology security (IT security) is the security of computer systems in the theft of or damage to their own hardware, applications, or digital information, in addition to in the disruption or misdirection of their solutions they supply. The area is becoming more important because of greater reliance on computer technologies, the web and wireless system standards like Bluetooth and Wi-Fi, and as a result of development of "smart" devices, such as televisions, smartphones, and the numerous devices which constitute the"Internet of things". Due to its complexity, both regarding science and politics, cybersecurity can also be one of the significant challenges in the modern world.

What's cyber security?

Organizations face many threats to their data systems and information. Knowing all of the fundamental elements to cyber safety is the first step to fulfilling these threats.

Types of cyber security.

The reach of cyber protection is broad. The core regions are explained below, and some other fantastic cyber security plan must take all of them into consideration.

Critical infrastructure includes the cyber-physical systems which society is based on, for example, electricity grid, water purification, traffic lighting and hospitals. Plugging a power plant to the world wide web, as an instance, makes it vulnerable to cyber attacks. The solution for associations accountable for critical infrastructure would be to carry out due diligence to safeguard recognize the vulnerabilities and protect from them. Everyone else must evaluate the way an attack on critical infrastructure that they rely on could impact them and develop a contingency plan.
Critical infrastructure.
Critical infrastructure includes the cyber-physical systems which society is based on, for example, electricity grid, water purification, traffic lighting and hospitals. Plugging a power plant to the world wide web, as an instance, makes it vulnerable to cyber attacks. The solution for associations accountable for critical infrastructure would be to carry out due diligence to safeguard recognize the vulnerabilities and protect from them. Everyone else must evaluate the way an attack on critical infrastructure that they rely on could impact them and develop a contingency plan.
Network security guards against malicious intrusion in addition to malicious insiders. Ensuring network security frequently requires trade-offs. By way of instance, access controls like additional logins may be required, but slow down productivity. Tools used to track network safety create a great deal of information -- so much that legitimate alarms are often overlooked. To help better handle network security monitoring, safety teams are using machine learning how to flag abnormal traffic and alert to risks in real time.
Network security.
Network security guards against malicious intrusion in addition to malicious insiders. Ensuring network security frequently requires trade-offs. By way of instance, access controls like additional logins may be required, but slow down productivity. Tools used to track network safety create a great deal of information -- so much that legitimate alarms are often overlooked. To help better handle network security monitoring, safety teams are using machine learning how to flag abnormal traffic and alert to risks in real time.
The business's move to the cloud generates new safety challenges. By way of instance, 2017 has seen nearly weekly information breaches from badly configured cloud cases. Cloud suppliers are creating new safety tools to help business users secure their information, however, the bottom line remains: Moving into the cloud isn't a panacea for performing due diligence in regards to cyber security.
Cloud security.
The business's move to the cloud generates new safety challenges. By way of instance, 2017 has seen nearly weekly information breaches from badly configured cloud cases. Cloud suppliers are creating new safety tools to help business users secure their information, however, the bottom line remains: Moving into the cloud isn't a panacea for performing due diligence in regards to cyber security.
Application security (AppSec), especially web application security, has become the weakest technical point of attack, but few organizations adequately mitigate all the OWASP Top Ten web vulnerabilities. AppSec begins with secure coding practices, and should be augmented by fuzzing and penetration testing. Rapid application development and deployment to the cloud has seen the advent of DevOps as a new discipline. DevOps teams typically prioritize business needs over security, a focus that will likely change given the proliferation of threats.
Application security.
Application security (AppSec), especially web application security, has become the weakest technical point of attack, but few organizations adequately mitigate all the OWASP Top Ten web vulnerabilities. AppSec begins with secure coding practices, and should be augmented by fuzzing and penetration testing. Rapid application development and deployment to the cloud has seen the advent of DevOps as a new discipline. DevOps teams typically prioritize business needs over security, a focus that will likely change given the proliferation of threats.
IoT describes a huge array of crucial and non-critical cyber physiological systems, such as appliances, sensors, printers and safety cameras. IoT devices often ship in an insecure condition and give little to no security, posing risks to not just their customers, but also to other people online, since these devices frequently find themselves part of a botnet. This presents special security challenges for the home users and society.
Internet of things (IoT) security.
IoT describes a huge array of crucial and non-critical cyber physiological systems, such as appliances, sensors, printers and safety cameras. IoT devices often ship in an insecure condition and give little to no security, posing risks to not just their customers, but also to other people online, since these devices frequently find themselves part of a botnet. This presents special security challenges for the home users and society.

What Is a JBoss Application Server? Ultimate JBoss Tutorial

If you’re as tapped in to the computer software community as I am, you might’ve noticed some chatter about JBoss. Red Hat, ASRC Federal Holding Company, and other multimillion-dollar software companies use JBoss application server as a framework for their products. So, what is the JBoss enterprise application platform? How do you use a JBoss ... Read more What Is a JBoss Application Server? Ultimate JBoss Tutorial

The post What Is a JBoss Application Server? Ultimate JBoss Tutorial appeared first on DNSstuff.


If you’re as tapped in to the computer software community as I am, you might’ve noticed some chatter about JBoss. Red Hat, ASRC Federal Holding Company, and other multimillion-dollar software companies use JBoss application server as a framework for their products. So, what is the JBoss enterprise application platform? How do you use a JBoss ... Read more What Is a JBoss Application Server? Ultimate JBoss Tutorial

The post What Is a JBoss Application Server? Ultimate JBoss Tutorial appeared first on DNSstuff.

If you’re as tapped in to the computer software community as I am, you might’ve noticed some chatter about JBoss. Red Hat, ASRC Federal Holding Company, and other multimillion-dollar software companies use JBoss application server as a framework for their products.

So, what is the JBoss enterprise application platform? How do you use a JBoss application server? How do you set up a JBoss server configuration? This JBoss server tutorial will answer all these questions. At the end of the tutorial, I’ll tell you how to get the most out of your JBoss application server with a powerful JBoss application monitoring tool.

What Is JBoss Application Server?
Quick JBoss Application Server Tutorial for Beginners
How to Deploy JBoss Application Server
Best JBoss Application Server Monitoring Tools

What Is JBoss Application Server?

JBoss application server is an open-source platform, developed by Red Hat, used for implementing Java applications and a wide variety of other software applications. You can build and deploy Java services to be scaled to fit the size of your business. When you integrate a JBoss application server with WildFly 10 you can unlock several cool features, like messaging, high-availability clustering, and distributed caching.

If open-source tools make you a little nervous, fear not—JBoss application server is compliant with Java Enterprise Edition 7 specifications. You can run JBoss application server on Linux, Unix, OS X, and Windows.

With a JBoss application server, you get a high class, enterprise-grade platform both reliable and scalable for zero cost. Its service-oriented and aspect-oriented structures make integration with other tools a snap. Also, unlike most open-source tools, JBoss application server comes with a 24/7 professional support system made up of developers, so you’re not left in the lurch when you experience technical difficulties.

JBoss application server is often abbreviated as JBoss AS, and many people use it interchangeably with JBoss Enterprise Application Server (EAS) or WildFly. For the purposes of this tutorial, we’re sticking with “JBoss application server” or “JBoss server” throughout.

Quick JBoss Application Server Tutorial for Beginners

JBoss Application Server

For this JBoss server tutorial I’m going to touch on the basics of configuration and deployment. Let’s break it down:

JBoss Server Configuration

Installing JBoss application server is easy—you can do it via the installer or ZIP file. Just make sure your system is Java 8 compliant and you have full administrative privileges.

JBoss AS uses a modular structure giving you two different options for setup—standalone server and managed domain. Standalone server is best for running JBoss AS as a single-server instance, while managed domain is best if you have multiple servers and want to be able to manage them from a single access point.

A quick word about this kind of structure: with modules you have to set explicit dependencies to be defined on all other modules within the system. To add external modules, change the JBOSS_MODULEPATH environment variable and use the following command:

export JBOSS_MODULEPATH=”$JBOSS_HOME/modules:/opt/jboss-eap/custom-modules”

For Linux/Unix/OS X, keep this command the same. For Windows, change the colon path separator to a semicolon.

JBoss AS uses standalone scripts to set defaults, but you can get around this by inputting the following command in the configuration file, which is located in the configuration directory: –c=name-of-config.xml.

Here’s your selection of startup scripts you can use to set up your own default settings:

  • Linux/Unix/OS X: $JBOSS_HOME/bin/standalone.sh
  • Windows: %JBOSS_HOME%\bin\standalone.bat

Domain startup scripts are subtly different, but the process of configuring them is the same:

  • Linux/Unix/OS X: $JBOSS_HOME/bin/domain.sh
  • Windows: %JBOSS_HOME%\bin\domain.bat

The next thing you’re going to want to do is set up administrative roles and users. Create management and application users by entering one of the following scripts:

  • Linux/Unix/OS X: $JBOSS_HOME/bin/add-user.sh
  • Windows:%JBOSS_HOME%\bin\add-user.bat

Management and application users will be stored, respectively, in these two “.properties” files: “mgmt-users.properties” and “application-users.properties.” After you’ve done that, you’ll be prompted through to configure individual users.

To access these files as a whole, input $JBOSS_HOME/standalone/configuration directory for a standalone server and $JBOSS_HOME/domain/configuration directory for a domain server. The operating system doesn’t matter in this instance.

You can also play around with standalone servers and managed domains by using the web console JBoss AS provides. Create a management user with one of the add-user scripts above, then open a web browser and navigate to http://localhost:9990.

Back to top

How to Deploy JBoss Application Server

There are a bunch of ways to deploy JBoss application server in Linux, Unix, OS X, and Windows. However, only the standalone server has a separate deployment directory. For more information, check out the “Read Me” txt.file located in the $JBOSS_HOME/standalone/deployments directory.

The most common methods for application deployment are via web console, command line interface, and Maven plugin.

  • Web Console: Open the “Deployments” tab and select “Add” in the left column. If you’re using a domain server, click “Add” in the “Content Repository” section of the “Deployments” tab. This will open up a wizard you’ll use to deploy the application.
  • Command Line Interface: Enter deploy—server-groups=main-server-group /path/to/app/application.war for domain.
  • Maven Plugin: Download this plugin and you’ll be able to deploy applications for both kinds of servers.

Now that you know your way around JBoss application server, it’s time to take JBoss to the next level.

Best JBoss Application Server Monitoring Tools

Once you’ve started using JBoss application server to build Java applications, you’re going to need an enterprise-grade tool to make sure your applications are running smoothly. SolarWinds® Server & Application Monitor (SAM) has a wealth of features to make JBoss monitoring and troubleshooting easy.

With SAM you can:

  • Keep track of health statuses for all applications running on your JBoss platform
  • Look into a ton of memory-related metrics, like heap, non-heap, leaks, pool, and more
  • Make sure you’re using your hardware efficiently
  • Monitor applications in your Java environment for almost every major platform—JBoss, Oracle, MySQL, Tomcat, Linux, VMware, etc.

sam-appstack

If you plan on working with a JBoss application server in the future, I highly recommend giving SolarWinds Server & Application Monitor a try. Check out the 30-day free trial, which gives you access to the tool’s full functionality.

The post What Is a JBoss Application Server? Ultimate JBoss Tutorial appeared first on DNSstuff.


Read full article on Blog